Kaiate Falls

Kaiate Falls

Hello, everyone – I’m back! Firstly, thank you to all the readers who messaged me over the Christmas break. It means a lot – not only that some people enjoy my writing, but that they actually find it helpful! Yay!

I suppose I should have expected the sudden rush of views, what with people googling where to visit over Christmas. I certainly found myself googling new places to visit, which is how I found the beautiful Kaiate Falls.

My partner and I were staying with my parents in Tauranga, in New Zealand’s Bay of Plenty. Tauranga is a fantastic place for a holiday. My 10 Free Things to Do around Tauranga happens to be one of the articles contributing to the sudden rush of views, and now I think I should make Kaiate Falls number eleven. Just look at the pictures I got!

Kaiate Falls

Kaiate Falls

Kaiate Falls

The walk around Kaiate Falls isn’t terribly long, but it does get quite steep. Despite the heat of the day, I was glad not to be visiting the falls in winter. I had the feeling that the paths would become uncomfortably muddy and slippery in wet weather. There were many people swimming in the falls, despite the sign at the top advising against it. I suppose as long as you don’t have any open wounds, and don’t swallow any of the water… It really is a pity about New Zealand’s waterways.

Kaiate Falls

But they’re lovely to look at. Check out The North Island’s 10 Best Waterfalls – although I’d probably replace Hunua Falls with Kaiate Falls now!

Kaiate Falls

After going to the falls, we went to the nearby Papamoa Beach. There’s nothing particularly special about Papamoa Beach, but the Bluebiyou Restaurant, which overlooks it, has wonderful food. Every mouthful of my mushroom risotto tasted divine, but I wanted to order everything on the menu! I’m looking forward to going back next time I’m in Tauranga.

Although I don’t think Papamoa Beach is particularly special, it’s still a very popular beach. And, I suppose, if it was the first New Zealand beach you’d ever seen, you’d be impressed. It’s not as crowded as Mount Maunganui’s main beach, being further along the coast from the Mount, and you can still bodyboard there.

Kaiate Falls

So… Kaiate Falls: if your visit to the Bay of Plenty is fleeting, don’t bother with the falls, as there are lots of other things you should see first, BUT if you’re going to be there a while, the falls are a great place to go. And here’s a bonus: if you have a self-contained campervan rental, you can stay at Kaiate Falls for up to three nights for FREE, and you don’t even have to book. For more New Zealand campervan hire holiday advice, check out my tips for travelling New Zealand in a motorhome.

Hope you’re all still having a wonderful summer. (Or winter!) See you next week.

The Best Place to Live in New Zealand

Mount Maunganui

Since moving to New Zealand, I’ve lived in four very different places:

1) Waiuku, a sleepy town south of Auckland,

Waiuku

2) Tauranga, a peaceful city in the Bay of Plenty,

Mount Beach

3) Auckland Central, the busiest part of New Zealand’s busiest city, and

Auckland Rangitoto

4) Hamilton, a city that’s mocked by the rest of the country, but actually has a lot going for it.

HamiltonChristmasTree

I’ve also experienced life out at Bethells Beach, as that’s where my partner’s from. He’d tell you it’s the best place to live in the country hands down, but I’m not so sure. Yes, it’s close to a very beautiful beach and boasts magnificent valley views, but it has its disadvantages too.

The mysterious West Coast (Bethells Beach)

So what is the best place to live in New Zealand? Obviously, I can only speak from my own experience, but someone somewhere might find this useful. I’m going to attempt an analysis of the four places I’ve lived, plus Bethells, beginning with…

Waiuku

Waiuku Weather StoneI was ten years old when we found ourselves in Waiuku, a small town surrounded by farmland. It’s located at the southern tip of the Manukau Harbour and is within easy driving distance of several beaches. The two nicest are Awhitu and Kariotahi, which, despite being quite close to one another, are whole worlds apart. Awhitu has calm waters and golden sand, making it perfect for picnics, whereas Kariotahi has wild waves and velvety, black sand, making it perfect for surfing. It’s also perfect for watching the sun set over the Tasman Sea from the cliff tops.

Waiuku Clock TowerIn Waiuku, we lived within easy walking distance of yet another beach, this one called Sandspit. I was always wandering down there. There was a big slide in the water… It’s still there, actually. I went to Sandspit Road School, a primary school that starts at Year 1 and finishes at Year 8. I remember being quite disappointed that I wouldn’t move up to “big school” in Year 7, as I would have done in England, instead having to wait until Year 9. I was bullied quite badly in the mean time. (I believe this had more to do with New Zealand’s – and especially small-town New Zealand’s – tendencies towards anti-intellectualism and tall poppy syndrome, though, than with me being an immigrant. See The People of New Zealand for an account of my first day of school in New Zealand.)

WaiukuDespite the bullying, Waiuku always felt like a safe town to me. My parents were letting me walk places on my own within days of settling there. The town centre was quiet, but lovely, with a few nice cafes and historic buildings. When my family first moved there, we believed it a wonderfully idyllic place. It was only after a few years that we were itching to get out. My parents both taught at Waiuku College, which had a rather high proportion of newly-emigrated teachers. We soon found out that was because no one who was familiar with Waiuku wanted to teach there. The newly-emigrated teachers were, like us, still seeing things through rose-tinted glasses.

The Kentish Hotel, WaiukuNot that rose-tinted, though. I mean, compared to where we’d just come from, Waiuku really was great. People mock it, and it does have its bad aspects, but it’s not a bad place to live. I recently returned there for a few hours with my partner, only to find that it’s actually improved in the ten years since I lived there. And it’s set to grow even further. With the Auckland housing shortage and rocketing house prices, Waiuku’s becoming a popular place to commute from. It’s only a fifty-minute drive from Auckland City. Well, fifty minutes without traffic, that is. With traffic, I shudder to think.

WaiukuOnce, I would have said don’t live in Waiuku. Run from it. But I’m not going to say that now. If you’re after a peaceful, small-town life that’s not too isolated, you could do a lot worse. Waiuku’s problems are the problems you’d expect of any small town; its rewards are many.

Tauranga

Mount Maunganui BeachWhen my family lived in Waiuku, we once went on holiday to Tauranga. I never dreamed we’d end up living there! It’s somewhere rich people live. We were never rich. We lived in a tiny terrace with a shared garden in England, but, lifestyle-wise, we got very lucky, I guess. When we moved to New Zealand in 2001, the exchange rate was three New Zealand dollars for every one pound, so we ended up with a house far nicer than we ever could have had in England. Then, when we moved to Tauranga, my nana sold her house in England and came to live with us, so we could get an even nicer house… Yeah, we got lucky.

Red Square, TaurangaTauranga is a balmy, coastal city that’s an extremely popular retirement destination. I love the fact that while it has all the amenities of a city, it’s still quite small. It feels so laidback, especially compared to Auckland – even Hamilton. It has lots of flash bars and restaurants, and plenty of awesome places to go shopping, but it’s relaxed. You can stroll along the harbourfront and climb Mount Maunganui, and you can take your pick of beaches.

TaurangaOf course, being a city, Tauranga has a few different schools to choose from. The school I ended up at, Otumoetai College, turned out to be a lot better for me than Waiuku College had been. Waiuku College had been too small to offer subjects such as Classical Studies, which turned out to be my favourite subject! There were simply more opportunities at Otumoetai. I wasn’t bullied there, either, although that might be to do with the fact that I was now in Sixth Form, or Year 12, and bullying tends to drop off at that age.

Mount Bench(My little sister got bullied there, though. One boy in particular wouldn’t leave her alone. Until the day she lost it in front of the whole school and started beating him up. The teachers hated to punish her, really.)

I was only in Tauranga for two years before it was time to leave for university. I chose the University of Auckland partly because it’s the only university in New Zealand to be ranked amongst the top 100 universities in the world, and partly because it’s only a three-hour drive from Tauranga. My parents still live in Tauranga, so I go back a lot and, every time I do, I marvel at how wonderful a place it is to live.

Auckland Central

Sky TowerI lived in Auckland Central from 2009 – 2013. Three of those years I spent on Whitaker Place, the most densely populated street in New Zealand. (Parking was a nightmare.) Whitaker Place is five minute’s walk from the main University of Auckland campus, so, naturally, it’s chock-a-block with student accommodation. When I lived there, a single room cost about $200 per week to rent and, knowing Auckland, it’s probably gone up significantly since. (And the Student Loan still only goes up to $176.86 per week.) Yes, Auckland prices are horrendous, but what’s it like to live in the city?

Auckland Domain Winter GardenActually pretty good. Auckland’s a very walkable city, and while its public transport isn’t the best, its buses are adequate. There are several great areas you can walk to from the centre: the Domain, Albert Park, Mount Eden and the harbourfront all come to mind. Being New Zealand’s biggest city, Auckland has the most jobs and the most things happening. Not being in Auckland, I miss being able to easily get to so many events. Many tourists and immigrants actually find Auckland a peaceful city, because, comparatively, it is. Fewer than two million people live there!

Auckland Book SwapAuckland feels very fresh as a city. Being right on the sea helps, I suppose. There are so many beaches, and nature walks are only half an hour’s drive away. Auckland was recently ranked as the world’s third most liveable city, because it does have a lot going for it. I managed to enjoy living there and, being a student, I really didn’t have any money to spare. If you do live in Auckland, though, be prepared to spend well over half of what you earn on housing, and be prepared to get stuck in traffic.

Hamilton

Garden Place, HamiltonDue to the Auckland housing crisis, more and more jafas are moving down to Hamilton, which is driving up Hamilton house prices, which is p**sing off all the Hamiltonians now having to compete for flats. (Jafa = Just Another F**king Aucklander.) Whenever this fact is mentioned, my partner and I look awkwardly away and begin to innocently whistle. Hamilton is an hour-and-a-half’s drive south of Auckland, and whilst some people are prepared to commute that far, my partner and I came here because it’s where he happened to score an IT job out of uni.

Waikato River, HamiltonWe also chose Hamilton because we wanted to live far enough away from our parents to feel independent, yet close enough to visit easily. Hamilton is an hour-and-a-half’s drive from Tauranga, where my parents live, and two hours from Bethells Beach, which I’ll talk about next.

That’s the thing about Hamilton. People are always talking about how conveniently close it is to other places. Oh, it’s great if you want to visit Raglan, or Waitomo, or Hobbiton… As for Hamilton itself, well…

Casabella Lane, HamiltonWhen we said we were moving here, people laughed at us. Hamilton is a small city, larger than Tauranga, but seen somehow as being comprised of farmers with ideas above their station. People mock it as the STD capital of New Zealand, even though statistics show that it’s not. True, the city centre of Hamilton isn’t particularly nice, except for Garden Place and Casabella Lane (in the picture,) there are a lot of beggars, and there’s not all that much to do, but, in all seriousness, Hamilton doesn’t deserve the reputation it has.

Chinese Garden, Hamilton GardensHamilton has three great things going for it: Firstly, the Hamilton Gardens. They’re officially amongst the best gardens in the world and they’re free to enter. Secondly, the Waikato River. While it’s polluted by farm run-off to the extent that you wouldn’t want to swim in it, (though people still do,) it looks very pretty, running directly through the city with plenty of trees, parks and bicycle paths along its banks. Thirdly, Hamilton Zoo is just as good as good as Auckland Zoo, if not better. Hamilton’s also got a lake that’s pleasant to walk around, walking distance from the city centre. Just don’t go there at night.

Parana Park Childrens Garden, HamiltonMy partner and I actually quite enjoy living here. It’s nice to be able to walk and cycle places. (We only use the car for visiting our parents.) It’s got a few excellent playgrounds, (not that we’re planning on having kids any time soon,) and nice-looking houses. Whenever we go back to Auckland, my partner looks out of the window and goes, “Wow, look at the all the tall buildings and flashy lights! I’m not used to it anymore!”

Bethells Beach

Bethells BeachAlthough we met when we both lived on Whitaker Place, attending uni, my partner is from Bethells Beach, a community out in the wop-wops, on the very west coast of Auckland. It’s a rugged place, full of aging hippies living alternative lifestyles. It’s so peaceful. The only sound you occasionally hear echoing through the valley, my partner once joked, is that of a police helicopter searching for marijuana patches. Also known as Te Henga, Bethells Beach is one of the most beautiful beaches in the whole of New Zealand. I’m not biased. Well, I am, but it’s not just me. So many films, television series and music videos use Bethells for a location, especially those in the fantasy genre. It has a magical quality, something that just draws people to it… The community at Bethells is closer than in any place I’ve lived. People don’t just know their neighbours, they invite them to parties. They even have bands down at the beach in summer.

Bethells BeachBethells is surrounded by the emerald bush of the Waitakere Ranges Regional Park. Whenever we’re driving there, when we get to the edge of Auckland City and the trees start coming up around us, my partner simply sighs in relief. Of course, its isolation is both a pro and a con. It’s a half-hour drive along narrow, winding and sometimes unsealed roads to the nearest shops, further to a big supermarket. It’s ironic that people trying to lead such environmentally friendly lifestyles are forced to use so much petrol. Until recently, the Internet out at Bethells was almost unusable, but it’s getting better. The biggest drawback for me is all the mosquitoes, but apart from that, life at Bethells is almost perfect.

Bethells BeachIf you love nature, want to know your neighbours, enjoy a quiet life, want beach views, don’t get car sick and don’t mind long drives to buy food or, indeed, go anywhere else at all, Bethells Beach is a great place to live.

Tauranga Rocks 4I honestly think you could be happy living anywhere I’ve mentioned. I think it’s obvious, though, that my favourite is Tauranga. It’s peaceful, with beaches right on your doorstep, not to mention Mount Maunganui, and other nature walks an easy drive away, but with all the convenience that cities bring.

Jazzing It Up for Easter

band-691224_960_720

Every Easter since 1963, the sunny city of Tauranga has hosted New Zealand’s National Jazz Festival. My parents live in Tauranga, so, of course, they always go. This year, I went with them.

Despite the bad weather warnings, Easter 2016 was scorching. There were lots of ladies in absolutely lovely dresses! Everyone was having a great time, drinking cold beers and sparkling wines, and dancing to the various different saxophones.

At the Tauranga Jazz Festival 2016

Five stages were set up at intervals along the Strand, Tauranga’s main street of bars and restaurants. It overlooks the harbourfront, where there’s a fantastic playground for kids. This weekend, there were a few fairground rides as well. Unfortunately, I was too big for the bouncy castle!

It cost a gold coin to enter. My family headed for our favourite pub, Brew, passing this quirky pop-up bar along the way…

At the Tauranga Jazz Festival 2016

It was quite crowded. Well of course it was. The Jazz Festival gets over 60,000 people attending now. (It takes place over a few days in a few different locations.) The atmosphere was great. I mean loud music and crowds aren’t necessarily my thing, but it was okay sitting at the edge of things with a nice glass of bubbly.

So if you’re coming to New Zealand and you find yourself in the Bay of Plenty area around Easter, head to Tauranga. There’s lots to do round there anyway. Check out my 10 Free Things to Do around Tauranga article for inspiration.

A Tortoise Hood Ornament on a Vintage Car

And, oh yeah, there were vintage cars there as well. I thought this was quite sweet.

Going Medieval in Tauranga

Roman Helmets, Tauranga Medieval Faire, New Zealand

Gladiators, Tauranga Medieval Faire, New ZealandThe air tasted of sweat, dust and sunscreen. The scent of parched grass, greasy food and distant animal dung hung over the arena. Two potbellied gladiators sized each other up, blunted weapons poised. They hadn’t quite gotten the cheers they’d wanted – the crowd encircling them was half-wilted by the fierce sunlight. I was part of that crowd, and within the sweeping sleeves of my medieval dress my arms were roasting.

Celtic Cross Shield, Tauranga Medieval Faire, New ZealandI knew I’d get too hot wearing my medieval dress to the Tauranga Medieval Faire last weekend, but I couldn’t not wear it. It’s so beautiful. I got heaps of compliments! The Medieval Faire was combined with the A & P Show – that’s agricultural and pastoral – at the Tauranga Racecourse. That’s why you kept getting the smell of animal dung, but for once I didn’t mind. It made the ‘faire’ feel more realistic.

Druid, Tauranga Medieval Faire, New ZealandNot that the gladiator fights were realistic – or medieval. There were Roman reenactors amongst the medieval and Norse reenactors. And an Iron Age hut. It was jolly mix of things. There was even a real druid! I enjoyed having a go at archery – as I always do – and talking to the various stall owners. I’m not usually able to talk to strangers, but, of course, these strangers were just as passionate about history as I was. We all bemoaned New Zealand’s lack of castles!

Roman Standard, Tauranga Medieval Faire, New ZealandIt cost $10 to get into the racecourse. The Medieval Faire itself was free, but you had to pay for the A & P Show, even if you weren’t interested in going round all the farm stuff. Ah well. Hardly a rip-off. It was a good day out. (Even if, due to the heat, we didn’t actually last the full day.)

There seem to be a lot of ‘Medieval Faires’ happening around New Zealand. Apparently, many European-descended Kiwis still yearn for the old world, even as New Zealand moves into the future and talks of severing ties with England. Or maybe dressing up in medieval costumes is just fun.

Suit of Armour, Tauranga Medieval Faire, New ZealandMore from around Tauranga…

10 Free Things to Do in Tauranga

Shopping in Downtown Tauranga

Why Living in Tauranga Ruins You for Life

Mount Maunganui

Te Puna Quarry Park

New Zealand campervan hire

How I Adopted My Kiwi Identity and Never Looked Back – A Guest Post by Matt Hetherington

MattHetheringtonMountMaunganui

In September 1995, at the mere age of 5 years old, I left my country of birth, England. A country I would to this day never set eyes on again. My parents had decided it was time for a fresh start, we left our life and our family behind and ventured to what seemed like the end of the world.

Before long my accent was gone, I began school and I started my life in New Zealand. Memories of the UK fell into the distant past and I quickly began to discover that New Zealand wasn’t a bad place at all.

Probably most fortunate of all was where my parents decided to settle. After a year in Auckland and it’s traffic and average weather, we relocated to Tauranga.

To this day Tauranga has remained to be one of my favourite places. It’s just incredibly peaceful and pleasant. There are around 2400 hours of sunshine in a year and enough sand and surf for any keen beachgoer. Summer in Tauranga made me quickly adopt the city as my home, and despite not having lived there for some time now, I still see it as my favourite place in New Zealand. I enjoyed walking on the beach in the summer and hiking up The Mount, especially when I had friends from other cities and places with me.

MattHetheringtonMountMaunganuiView

View from Mount Maunganui / Matt Hetherington

So What Is It I Love About New Zealand?

Geographic Diversity

It’s really a unique place. It seems like a small country but the terrain is forever changing. In 2012 when I moved for 6 months from Hamilton (North Island) to Christchurch (South Island), I almost felt like I had moved countries again. Within one small pair of islands there is a horizon full of bush/forests, snowy alps, volcanoes on land, volcanoes at sea, hills, surf beaches, peaceful bays, glaciers and more.

I think one of the nicest things is that everywhere is so close to the sea or a large body of water. Sometimes surf and bays can be separated by a small spit of land like in Bowentown, Waihi Beach or Mount Maunganui. We used to spend the early afternoon swimming in the bay in the calm water and then after lunch head over to the surf beach with the camping ground square in the middle of both. It was perfect.

FOOD!

Foodstore DessertIt is as diverse as it’s population. Now on my trips home I usually reside in Auckland, one thing I enjoy there is the food. Now spending so much time in the USA I can say that the food culture in New Zealand is amazing. The large Asian population in Auckland city provides a really good standard of Asian cuisine, actually I would rate the Dim Sum in Auckland among some of the best I have ever had. The cafe culture here is just awesome, I think what I really like is the quality of the food. Even our fast food seems to have much better standards than other places.

The agriculture in New Zealand means that fruit and vegetables, meat, dairy and seafood are all really great quality and that makes the food outstanding!

The People

Native KiwiGenerally speaking I have enjoyed growing up with the people in this country and have, for a long time, identified as one of them, a kiwi. I became a NZ Citizen very late, in 2008 in fact, a long time after moving to New Zealand. I think New Zealanders have a sense of ‘chill’, they are laid back to the point of probably being seen as lazy by foreigners. The lifestyle is easy going, they are creative and fun people.

New Zealand was more than a home to me, it really is a beautiful country. Although I have spread my wings again and am basing myself in the USA very soon, I will be visiting home frequently (probably in the summer). I think one of the only disadvantages for travellers is that it is so far away and can cost a lot to travel to, but for me it’s coming home so it’s a necessary expense!

The more I heard about the UK and how it was changing the less compelled I felt to make a trip home, my family went on numerous occasions but I never took the opportunity to go with them. Perhaps someday soon I will make the trip but I don’t think it will change the fact that I’m a kiwi at heart 🙂

kiwi-309620_640Matt Hetherington is a 25-year-old travelling professional table tennis athlete from New Zealand. Born in the UK and now residing in the United States he operates two blogs, www.mhtabletennis.com for his table tennis fans and a new blog about his travel experiences, www.pongventure.com. He identifies as a kiwi and has represented New Zealand for his entire playing and coaching career.

Classic Flyers – Somewhere to Go if You’re in the Bay of Plenty

Classic Flyers

Something you might not know about the Tauranga/Mount Maunganui area is it has a rather good aviation museum. It’s called Classic Flyers and you can find it at Tauranga Airport. Now I’m not really interested in planes, but, unfortunately for me, my dad is, which is why I found myself there a few weeks ago. Nevertheless, I was pleasantly diverted.

RedPlane

I’d been to Tauranga Airport a few times, picking up my visiting grandfather and attending the Tauranga Airshow, but I’d never been to the museum. It has a surprisingly nice café that’s wonderfully decorated, and the gift shop is a haven for modelling nerds. It’s a very small museum – the size of a hangar, basically, but we managed to spend quite a bit of time there.

It cost $15 each to get in and there was a kid’s birthday party going on when we arrived. I was jealous of them climbing into the gunner tower – what is that thing? Is it called a gunner tower? I obviously wasn’t paying much attention. I was too distracted by the Star Wars music going through my head. You know, this bit:

My dad’s been to Classic Flyers heaps. He was taking flying lessons. You can do that there, and book one-of flights in classic planes. Dad learned how to fly a glider because that was cheapest. I’m sure he’d rather have flown a Spitfire. There’s a Spitfire in the museum, or at least a full-scale replica. I’m sure it’s great if you love old planes. There’s this biggish one you can go in. I hit my head.

NZ SoldiersThere was an awesome temporary exhibit on about the experiences of the local ANZACS – the Australians and New Zealanders sent off to fight in World War I. 2015 is the centenary of the Gallipoli tragedy, so there’s been special emphasis put on ANZAC commemorations this year. The exhibit was beautifully done and worth the ticket price alone.

Uh, what else to say about it? Planes. If you’re travelling around New Zealand and/or looking for something to do in Tauranga/Mount Maunganui, and if you’ve got kids, or you’re especially interested in aviation history… or if you’re looking for a nice café, I suppose… drop in on Classic Flyers.

AreYouMyMummy

P.S. I found this in the ANZAC exhibit and simply couldn’t resist… Any Doctor Who fans in? All together now: “Are you my mummy?”

Why Living in Tauranga Ruins You for Life

Pilot Bay 2

I live in Tauranga, New Zealand. But not for much longer. The time has come to fly the nest.

To Hamilton.

Laugh all you want. Hamilton’s a nice place. (I’ve written about it here – fingers crossed I won’t have to eat my words!) But it’s not as nice as Tauranga.

Living in Tauranga has ruined me for anywhere else.

Just yesterday, we visited our local beach and took a few pictures.

Mount Beach 2Tauranga Rocks 4Pilot Bay

Yes, that’s our local beach. That’s Mount Maunganui, known locally as the Mount. Well, actually, as the Mount is situated at the end of a very narrow peninsula that has a beach on either side, that’s two of our many local beaches. And if you walk around the base of the Mount, you’ll find many more miniature beaches and so be able to claim your own private beach. God, I love living in Tauranga.

Mount Bench 2

Tauranga is the perfect place for a holiday. In fact, my family came here for a holiday about ten years ago. I never imagined we’d end up living here.

Mount Maunganui Beachside Holiday ParkThere’s a holiday park right at the foot of the Mount. (That’s it in the photograph.) If you ever hire a campervan in New Zealand, you should totally take it there.

There are hot pools right next-door. Locals get a discount, (you just have to take in a bill or something to prove you live in Tauranga,) but so do patrons of the holiday park.

Also, just across the road is a very nice ice cream parlour called Copenhagen Cones. This place even does baby cones for $1 – why, oh why can’t ALL ice cream parlours do this?

Proud TuiYesterday, we took advantage of the glorious spring weather to walk around the base of the Mount. The sun was really hot, but the Mount base track is partly shaded and you get a cooling breeze off the sea. The pohutukawa trees on both sides of the track were teeming with tuis showing off to attract mates. In summer, the track is resplendent with the Christmas-red blooms of the pohutukawa.

I found a wonderful place for a picnic.

Mount Bench

And I observed a native Kiwi in its natural habitat.

Native Kiwi

It was a good day.

Mount Base Track